What Litigation PR Can Do for Your Business

This week, we’d like to focus on a very fascinating but little known faculty of public relations called Litigation PR. This subset of public relations serves lawyers and organizations during legal proceedings.

Lawsuits pose serious reputational threats to organizations and individuals alike. When the information about a lawsuit leaks to the public, it often gives birth to damaging rumors and speculation. In the past, companies tended to refrain from commenting on legal matters. However, in today’s hyper-connected society, where news spreads around the world in a matter of minutes, businesses can no longer afford to let the media frame the situation.

Today, both lawyers and corporate spokespeople are expected to actively work with reporters providing them with official statements and information about a particular case. The quality and effectiveness of this communication often determines how the defendant is perceived by the public, which, in some instances, may even influence the outcome of the case itself.

This is why, now more than ever, both law firms and their clients turn to litigation PR agencies to help communicate their side of the story to the public.

In addition to working with the media, litigation PR specialists strategically engage the public via social media, influencing the overall narrative and ensuring that their clients’ point of view is fairly represented and understood.

Responding to or initiating legal action is bound to attract a lot of attention and expose your brand to scrutiny and potential PR crises. This is why it is absolutely necessary to have a comprehensive communications strategy in place that will allow you to stay in control of your messaging.


Hiring a reputable PR firm that specializes in litigation PR will help your company effectively communicate with key stakeholders during the unpredictable flow of legal environments.

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